Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Naturally Clean your Washer & Dryer

Cleaning your washing machine helps get your clothes cleaner, as well as keeps the machine running efficiently. Cleaning your dryer gets you a hotter, more efficient dry and also helps prevent dryer fires (this is a good thing).
This video will show you how to properly clean your washing machine and dryer. 

Friday, February 19, 2016

8 MovesFor Strong & Toned Arms

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Wood Burning Art - Giraffe & Quote
 I was inspired to do this piece because it is my Life Motto quote...a reminder that everything is always working out for me, no matter how chaotic things may seem at the time, things always work out to my advantage! It's always working out for you too, always. I paired it with two dolphins, because they are my favorite animals, and a peaceful lotus at the bottom seemed fitting ^_^
This was a piece similar to the Elephant piece I did. I do love the Zentangle style.

Available at - Anita's Craft Shop 

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

11 Fitness Foods to Help You Get in Shape Faster

The right foods can help you build muscle, improve endurance, and speed recovery.

 Eats for athletes by Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD
As a sports nutritionist, I'm always on the lookout for research about how various foods can enhance athletic performance, speed recovery, and build muscle mass. When I pass this info on to my clients, they often feel the effects quickly, and I relish remarks they share like, "Wow, what a difference!" or "I feel 10 years younger." Here are 11 foods currently on my "eats for athletes" list, the research behind why they deserve a place on your training table, and simple, healthy ways to take advantage of their benefits.
Watch the video: What to Eat After a Workout  

Beet juice for stamina

Recent research shows that this ruby red root veggie may be more effective at boosting energy than caffeine, or nearly anything you'll find in the supplement aisle. When UK researchers asked male athletes to down either 16 ounces of organic beetroot juice or a placebo, those who gulped the real thing cycled for up to 16% longer, an effect scientists say isn't achievable by any other known means, including training. To bolster your performance, invest in a juicer and grab some fresh beets, which are in season year-round. Or look for bottled beet juice, which can be sipped straight or blended into a pre-workout smoothie.


Honey for endurance

Research conducted at the University of Memphis Exercise and Sport Nutrition Laboratory found that consuming honey before exercise provides "time-released" fuel to give athletes steady blood sugar and insulin levels over a longer duration. This natural sweetener also boosted power, speed, and endurance in competitive cyclists who downed it prior to and at 10-mile intervals throughout a 40-mile race. For quality and purity, I recommend USDA Certified Organic raw honey. Enjoy it straight off a spoon, or mix it into a pre-workout snack like oatmeal.

Pea protein to delay muscle fatigue

Pea protein powder has been generating serious buzz in the sports nutrition community for some time now. The reason: it's rich in branched chain amino acids, compounds that have been shown to delay fatigue during exercise. The arginine in this powder (which is made from yellow peas) has also been shown to enhance immunity, while the lysine boosts calcium absorption and decreases calcium losses to help maintain strong bones. One scoop can pack more than 25 grams of lean protein, which can be whipped into a smoothie along with almond milk, a dollop of almond butter, cinnamon, and frozen cherries or berries.

Blueberries to reduce inflammation

To test the anti-inflammatory and recovery effects of blueberries, researchers at Appalachian State University recruited well-trained athletes and fed them about 9 ounces of blueberries daily for six weeks, plus another 13 ounces an hour before a two-and a-half-hour run. The results were impressive. In addition to a reduction in inflammation, blueberry eaters experienced a boost in natural killer cells, a type of white blood cell that plays a vital role in immunity. When fresh blueberries aren't practical, reach for dried or freeze dried options to stash in your gym bag.


Tart cherries to fight pain and regain strength

At the University of Vermont's Human Performance Laboratory, researchers asked men to drink either 12 ounces of a tart cherry juice blend or a placebo twice daily for eight days. On the fourth day of the study, the athletes completed a strenuous strength-training routine. Two weeks later, the opposite beverage was provided, and the training was repeated. Scientists found that the cherry juice had a significant effect on pain reduction. In addition, strength loss averaged 22% in the placebo group compared to just 4% in the cherry group. Fresh tart cherries are only in season in late summer, but frozen and dried options are becoming easier to find, as is 100% tart cherry juice.


Salmon to build muscle

The omega-3 fatty acids found in fatty fish like salmon have been linked to a laundry list of benefits, from fighting heart disease to staving off type 2 diabetes. But animal research shows it may also be a potent muscle booster. Compared to steers fed cottonseed and olive oils, those that consumed fish oil showed improved muscle development: their bodies used twice the amount of amino acids to build new protein tissues, especially skeletal muscles. Include wild salmon in meals a few times a week, or try salmon jerky as a portable snack. If you can't or don't eat seafood, look for an algae-based source of omega-3s.

Watermelon to reduce muscle soreness

Recently, Spanish sports medicine scientists discovered that watermelon juice helped relieve muscle soreness when about 16 ounces were consumed an hour before exercise. The effect is likely due to citrulline, a natural substance found in watermelon that's been tied to improved artery function and lowered blood pressure (it's even been dubbed "nature’s Viagra"). I'm starting to see bottled watermelon juice popping up all over the place. And when you eat it fresh, be sure to bite into the white rind a bit—that's where citrulline is found in higher concentrations.

Pomegranate for muscle strength recovery

The antioxidants in pomegranate have been linked to enhanced memory and brain activity, and now researchers at the University of Texas at Austin report that pomegranate juice helps improve muscle recovery. Researchers recruited volunteers who were randomly assigned to maintain their normal diets and add 4 ounces of either pomegranate juice or a placebo twice a day. Both groups performed resistance-training exercises, but those who gulped pom experienced significantly less muscle soreness and reduced muscle weakness for up to 7 days. Pomegranate is a winter fruit, but you can find frozen options year-round. Just thaw and add to oatmeal, parfaits, or garden salads. Small shots of 100% juice are also a good option.

Coffee for next-day energy

A recent study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology found that glycogen, the body's storage form of carbohydrates, is replenished more rapidly when athletes consume both carbs and caffeine following exhaustive exercise. Compared to carbs alone, the combo resulted in a 66% increase in muscle glycogen 4 hours after intense exercise. That's significant because packing more fuel into the energy "piggy banks" within your muscles means that the next time you train or perform, you’ve upped your ability to exercise harder or longer.

Watercress to reduce DNA damage

A recent study published in the British Journal of Nutrition found that watercress, a peppery green from the mustard family, effectively countered the "wear and tear" effects of exercise. Healthy young men were given about 3 ounces of watercress daily for eight weeks, and asked to participate in treadmill workouts that included short bursts of intense exercise. Another exercise group did the workouts without watercress as a control. The men who missed out on watercress experienced more exercise-induced DNA damage, and the benefits were seen after just one dose. In other words, those who ate the green for the first time just two hours before hitting the treadmill experienced the same benefits as those who had munched on it daily for two months. Watercress makes a wonderful salad base and, like spinach and kale, it can be whipped into a smoothie.


Dark chocolate to curb exercise-induced stress

Numerous studies support the myriad benefits of dark chocolate and new research published in the European Journal of Nutrition adds exercise protection to the list. In the study, healthy men were asked to eat 3.5 ounces of 70% dark chocolate two hours before a two-and-a-half-hour bout of cycling. Compared to a control group, the chocolate eaters experienced higher blood antioxidant levels and reduced markers of exercise-induced cell stress. Enjoy a few individually wrapped squares of dark chocolate daily, melt and drizzle it over fresh fruit, or mix it into oatmeal, smoothies, or parfaits. 

Monday, February 15, 2016

RAW HONEY Kills Every Kind of Bacteria

THIS Type of RAW HONEY Kills Every Kind of Bacteria Scientists Could Throw At It (Even the Super-Bugs!)

Manuka Honey
The health benefits of raw, unprocessed honey are well known, but in Australia, scientists recently made a startling discovery – that one particular, obscure type of honey is capable of killing just about everything scientists throw at it, including some of the worst bacteria known to man.

The findings were published in the European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (June 2009 edition), and could hold special significance at a time when many of the world’s top antibiotics are failing, especially against resistant “superbugs.”

The honey in question is known as manuka honey, which is produced in New Zealand and also goes by the name of jelly bush honey.

The honey has become so popular in the past few years that shortages have been reported and fake products have been sold, leading New Zealand manuka producers to seek trademark protection (similar to French champagne or Scottish whiskey for example). It’s easy to see why now that the secret is out about this honey’s incredible health benefits.

Manuka Honey Kills MRSA, Other Superbugs 

Manuka honey is created by bees foraging on the nectar of Leptospermum Scoparium, the New Zealand manuka bush, as well as tea trees native only to Australia and New Zealand.

In the aforementioned studies, Australian researchers found that the honey killed every bacteria or pathogen it was tested on, according to a report by The Australian. The honey can be applied topically to help fight against infections of the skin, cuts and insect bites, or taken internally.

The most exciting difference with the manuka honey that was tested is that none of superbugs killed by the honey were able to build up immunity, a common problem with today’s antibiotics.

“New antibiotics tend to have short shelf lives, as the bacteria they attack quickly become resistant,” said Dr. Dee Carter of the University of Sydney’s School of Molecular and Microbial Biosciences. “Many large pharmaceutical companies have abandoned antibiotic production because of the difficulty of recovering costs. Developing effective alternatives could therefore save many lives.”

According to Dr. Carter the manuka honey contains a compound called methyglyoxal, that combines with other unknown compounds to cause “multi-system failure” that destroys the bacteria.

Where to Find Manuka Honey
Manuka honey is now sold in health food stores and online, although the supply levels have fluctuated in recent years and fake honey scams have been documented. When looking for manuka honey it is best to look for one that is UMF certified.

The term UMF stands for Unique Manuka Factor, which is the phytochemical property derived from the manuka bushes that gives it its unique properties. This term is regulated by the Unique Manuka Factor Honey Association of New Zealand and a handful of certified manuka products can be found on
The brand Comvita manuka honey is available on Amazon and is UMF certified. 

One particular customer on Amazon said that it this type of honey helped to erase their MRSA:

I had done a fair amount of research when a friend of ours got MRSA, and then, unfortunately, I got it too., said user JoshuaOne9 on Amazon. Thankfully, I had already done the research so I knew exactly what to do. As soon as I saw the red bump (thinking the first day that it was a mosquito bite) I scratched it, but the second day I realized that it had to be something else. My husband immediately knew what it was since we had been dealing with our friend’s case of MRSA. I got my hands on this Manuka honey and put on the area of skin that was affected and then it is very important that you cover it with a bandaid. Within hours I felt relief and within a few days it was completely gone…

While further research needs to be done, it’s safe to say that manuka honey shows plenty of promise in defeating one of the biggest health challenges faced by humanity in the 21st century, and this research should not be taken lightly.

This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to treat, diagnose or prevent disease. Consult a licensed naturopathic doctor before making any major changes to your diet or lifestyle. 


Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Crochet pipsqueak shell scarf 22 - Baby Blue & White

View my items for sale here:   

Measurements - 43” x 6”

·         6 mm crochet hook or J hook

·         bernat® Pipsqueak yarn Whitey White & Baby Blue

Pattern: 9 rows + boarder around

Ch 106 (Or chain any amount in groups of 6+3 until you get the width you like)

Row 1: sc in 2nd ch from hook, *sk 2 ch, 5 dc in next ch, sk 2 ch, sc in next ch, repeat from * across, ending with a sc. Ch 3, turn work Away from body.

Row 2: 2dc in first st (same spot where you chained up 3), *sk 2 sts, sc in next st (middle dc of group of 5 dc from prev. row), sk 2 sts, 5 dc in next st (sc from prev. row), repeat from * across. Ending with 3 dc in last st, change color in last st. ch 1 with new color, turn (See video for guidance)

Row 3: sc in first st, *sk 2 sts, 5 dc in next st, sk 2 sts, sc in next st, repeat from *across. Ending with sc. Ch 3, turn

Rows 4-9: Repeat rows 2 and 3 for the rest of the pattern. Changing color according to design.

Boarder around whole scarf to create a wavy boarder all around the scarf